Alternative Economics

Economics, Culture and Society: Alternative Approaches

Economics, Culture and Society: Alternative ApproachesThe essayists in this volume are united in their deep dissatisfaction with neoclassical economics and the dominance of the market as they explore alternative approaches to economics in its social and cultural context.

Their essays cover a broad range of ideas and schools of thought from the European cultural-historical approach, reflected in the work of Karl Planyi and Fernand Braudel, to the “human economy” school in the United States and the “green” view of economic development, with roots in Northern Europe.

The concluding essay reaches beyond economics to project a “new heresy” in the respiritualization of society.


The GAIA Atlas of Green Economic

The GAIA Atlas of Green EconomicsEvery day, all over the world, billions of people play their part in humanity’s global growth economy. Money is the god, material wealth the principal virtue, and market economics the ruler of our times.

But this economics of consumption is full of hidden costs. It is drawing us ever deeper into social, ecological, and economic crisis. We are trading the health of the Earth and our communities for freeways and the free market.

This pioneering work in “green” economics shows us a way out of this destructive obsession with economic growth. It explores a new concept of wealth and wealth creation; it describes a new economics synthesis between the market, state, families, and communities; it sets out what governments and people can do to build a sustainable society – to create prosperity and a fairer world in a healthy environment.


Greed and Good: Understanding and Overcoming the Inequality That Limits Our Lives

Greed and Good: Understanding and Overcoming the Inequality That Limits Our Lives Should we care that wealth in the United States is unequally distributed — and getting more so every year?

Should we worry that America’s most wealthy, in just a generation, have more than doubled their share of the nation’s wealth?



Washington's New Poor Law: Welfare Reform and the Roads Not Taken, 1935 to the Present

Washington's New Poor Law: Welfare Reform and the Roads Not Taken, 1935 to the Present The authors argue that the personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act, popularly known as welfare “reform”, offers neither work opportunity nor real reform.

In repealing the entitlement to welfare and failing to create an entitlement to work – at the same time as it imposes strict, time-limited work requirements – Washington has, in effect, written a new Poor Law.


Global Aggression: The Case for World Standards and Bold Us Action Challenging

Global Aggression: The Case for World Standards and Bold Us Action Challenging An expose by INFACT (now Corporate Accountability International) of the role of the US-based tobacco corporations Philip Morris and RJR Nabisco in aggressively promoting tobacco internationally, contributing to the deaths of 3.5 million people worldwide per year.

Filled with examples of manipulation of public policy and big Tobacco’s disregard for advertising restrictions in other countries, Global Aggression builds a case for a combination of consumer pressure and world standards to stop the spread of tobacco-related diseases and hold tobacco transnationals accountable.


Jobs for All: A Plan for the Economic and Social Revitalization of America

Jobs for All: A Plan for the Economic and Social Revitalization of America Chronic unemployment, underemployment and declining wages appear to be the defining characteristics of the “New World Order”, according to the authors of Jobs For All.

Drawing upon an impressive array of research, the authors develop a powerful analysis of the impact of domestic and global economic restructuring on American workers, families and communities and propose a comprehensive program of Jobs For All as a solution to the many social, economic and environmental problems plaguing American Society.


The Maximum Wage: A Common Sense Prescription for Revitalizing America by Taxing the Very Rich

The Maximum Wage: A Common Sense Prescription for Revitalizing America by Taxing the Very Rich More than 5 decades ago, in 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt advanced the most daring legislative proposal of the entire New Deal era: a maximum wage on the incomes of America’s wealthy. Roosevelt’s maximum wage proposal, argues author Sam Pizzigatti, deserves a careful reconsideration.

A maximum wage may be just what America needs to re-energize our lackluster democracy, jump start an ailing economy, and throttle the envy and grasping that so characterize contemporary American Life.


Humanistic Economics: The New Challenge

Humanistic Economics: The New ChallengeEconomics has long been imprisoned by a one-dimensional view of the person and the narrow assumption of self-interest that this entails.

Humanistic Economics breaks out of this paradigm by proposing an alternative framework that is no longer incompatible with actions undertaken for the sake of deeply held values, compelling reasons, and higher interests.